Work And Family Enrichment And Orientation Towards Job Satisfaction: Assessing Cross-Cultural Differences

Author: Jarrod Haar (MASSEY UNIVERSITY), Maree Roche (WAIKATO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY), Nannan Cui (UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO)

 

Work-Life Balance and Flexibility
[Slot K] Parallel Sessions (Friday, June 8th 2012 08:00 - 09:00)
V - Building, VB-47

Cross-cultural work-family issues remain under researched and the present study tests work and family orientation and enrichment towards job satisfaction on a cross-cultural sample of 101 Chinese and 106 New Zealand employees, matched by profession. Using structural equation modeling, a partial mediation model was found to be the best fit overall, but when compared individually, full mediation fitted the New Zealand data better while partial mediation the Chinese data. Orientation was found to be a strong antecedent of enrichment, but also had indirect effects for Chinese employees towards job satisfaction. While work-family and family-work enrichment predicted job satisfaction for New Zealand employees, only family-work enrichment was significant for Chinese employees. The findings show that assessing cross-cultural differences may be best achieved by comparing individual data sets rather than combining data, especially as amounts of variance differed by 15-23 percent between enrichment dimensions and job satisfaction. We argue that when researchers combine eastern and western data sets the subtleties and nuances found within cross-cultural work-family research may be missed, potentially misleading the cultural implications required to develop and maintain a global workforce.

 

Keywords: Work-Family Enrichmen Work/family Orientations China & New Zealand